Save Sickle Point

The Vision for Sickle Point

The community of Kaleden envisions Sickle Point as a nature park. Public access would be maintained from the non-motorized KVR trail to the northern half of the upland area, and the beach area would be for day use only.

Access to the riparian and wetland areas would be restricted to appropriate trails and boardwalks as they are developed. Interpretative signage would document First Nations culture and heritage in the area, and the habitat, wildlife and fish resources of the Skaha Lake area. Sickle Point would be available as an educational resource for local schools.

If you wish to make a pledge, click on the following link:

Sickle Point Fund Pledge Form.

Sickle Point.jpg

Why Save Sickle Point?

Sickle Point must be be preserved. It has the highest conservation ranking (Class 1) by the Southern Okanagan Similkameen Biodiversity Conservation Strategy (Keeping Nature in Our Future).

Sickle Point's water birch and wild rose communities, which support endangered wildlife and aquatic species such as the yellow-breasted chat, Lewis’s woodpecker, Western Rattlesnake and pallid bat, are red-listed by the province. Sickle Point is also part of the migratory path for both resident and migrant wildlife, including the American white pelican and sandhill crane.

The Proposal for Preservation

Considerations

To the greatest extent possible, a philosophy of “just let it be” should be followed (i.e., a nature preserve/protected area, not a cultivated park) with consideration given to:

  • replanting the upland area with native tree species, such as ponderosa pine, poplar and cottonwood

  • leaving the central area of the property pretty much as is

  • rezoning of the property from RS-1 (low density residential) to PR (parks and recreation)

  • removing the marsh road in its entirety and allowing it to return to nature. This could be helped along with some vegetation restoration efforts.

 

Logistics/Tactics

Community involvement sessions will be held, but some initial suggestions include:

  • placing No Camping, No Fires, and other signs

  • placing of minimal amenities associated with public access (e.g., garbage cans, toilets)

  • allowing access to the beach by trail users, as well as boaters. Signs identifying property status would be visible to users.

  • installing educational signage along with rustic fencing to protect the southern riparian area surrounding the marsh. A similar approach could be taken at the northern end of the property, with signs highlighting upland vegetation and wildlife

  • turning sections of the marsh road into a wildlife-viewing walkway with interpretive signage

  • installing other interpretive boardwalk(s) on the property

  • under professional supervision, restoring habitats damaged in the past

  • seeking First Nations involvement as part of the planning process

Sickle Point in the News

The effort to save Sickle Point has made the news.

Penticton Western News, October 7, 2020.

Link: "Column: Sickle Point park concept comes full circle"

Skaha Matters, submitted for the October 2020 issue.

PDF: "Save Sickle Point"

Penticton Herald, September 21, 2020.

Link: "More than $100K committed to Sickle Point"

Castanet (Penticton, BC), September 21, 2020.

Link: "Working to save key land"

iNFOnews (Penticton, BC), September 19, 2020.

Link: "Time ticking on effort to buy ecologically valuable lakeshore property on Skaha Lake"

Penticton Herald, September 7, 2020.

Link: "Saving Sickle Point"

Castanet (Penticton, BC), September 5, 2020.

Link: "Hoping to save special site"

Fall foliage

What Does Making a Pledge Mean?

At present, the Save Sickle Point Committee is collecting pledges from individuals and groups to support the purchase of Sickle Point. A formal pledge form has been developed with the Community Foundation of the South Okanagan|Similkameen (CFSOS). Once you hit submit on the electronic form, you will receive a reply indicating your pledge has been accepted.

If you prefer to complete a hard copy, download it here: Sickle Point Fund Pledge document. The hard copy may be scanned and emailed, or mailed, to the address on the pledge form. 

Collecting pledges allows the Save Sickle Point Committee to share the broader community’s commitment to protecting Sickle Point when the committee meets with other funders or conservation groups to raise the funds to purchase Sickle Point.

Pledges are different than donations. Here is how it works:

  • a pledge is made with intention of a donation being made

  • when an offer is made to purchase the land and that offer has been accepted, the pledges may turn into donations

  • once a pledge has become a donation, it is made to the Sickle Point Fund held by the CFSOS

  • donations are eligible for an income tax receipt; if receipts are issued, the donation can’t be returned

  • pledges may not be turned into donations quickly, depending on the timeline allowed for the remaining funds to be raised.

Individuals or groups making a donation will not own a share of the land. The committee is in discussions with various funders and conservation groups, as well as government bodies, regarding land ownership.

Thank you for making a pledge to save this last remaining wetland on the shores of Skaha Lake.

Letters in Support of Sickle Point

The Save Sickle Point Committee has authored letters to government ministries.

Please feel free to download PDFs of those letters below.

Write Your Own Letter of Support

If you are interested in writing a letter of support for the preservation of Sickle Point, the following Word document contains information that may be helpful, such as who you can write to and points you may wish to include in your letter.

Thank you for any support you can provide.

Save Sickle Point Committee

 

Facebook group: Save Sickle Point

Email: chair@kaledencommunity.com

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Photo credit: Les Clarke